Accelerating the Future...

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    Katerva Awards

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    Previous Nominees & Winners

    Ethereum

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    Previous Nominees & Winners

    The Ocean Cleanup

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Context

Our global environment and economic security are inextricably intertwined. But increasing levels of greenhouse gases, environmental degradation, and natural resource depletion are precluding long-term social and economic security.

Global collaboration and coordinated, distributed action are vital to restore and replenish the world’s environmental and economic ecosystems. The old, siloed ways aren’t working. We need new ways to cooperate and innovate across the public and private sectors to meet the environmental and economic exigencies we face. Unity is needed. Coherence of initiatives is needed. Coalescence of invention, innovation, knowledge and investment is needed.

Katerva is designed to meet this imperative by uniting the people and the technology paramount to catalyzing and supporting sustainable innovation that is exponentially scalable.

The challenges mankind faces are colossal. But so are the courage, ingenuity, wisdom and heart of innovators, entrepreneurs and others the world over. Never before have we had such extraordinary tools for collaborative innovation. Never before have we had the technology to cull the world’s brightest minds and create an actionable platform of support for the common good.

News:
Sanergy wins - Katerva Award 2011 Grand Prize Winner : Katerva Award winner selected to have an immediate, scalable impact on transforming waste from slums into power for the people A new breed of social companies are showing how innovation can be scaled for both business opportunities and global good. Led by independent thinkers, these companies are making dents in conventional ways of thinking to defy and fight for global change. The Katerva Award identifies these companies as finalists annually in its global competition –– referred to by Reuters as "the Nobel Prize for Sustainability" –– with Sanergy, as the winning company this year, 2011. Sanergy, which was founded by MIT alumni, provides low-cost, sustainable, franchised sanitation centers throughout Kenya to address one of the biggest problems in developing economies today—poor and inefficient access to clean and safe sanitation. Some 3,000 ideas were submitted to the Katerva Award council last year and Sanergy was selected as this year’s winner –– as a force to transform locally and impact globally. “This innovation is exactly what’s needed to transform the world’s emerging economies, and when it works it will accelerate waste to energy initiatives in developing countries as well,” says Terry Waghorn, the founder and executive director of Katerva. “Emerging economies have the ability to leapfrog over Western world problems and give us something better and bigger to reach for. Sanergy can do this.” Sanitation is the number one impediment to growth and development in emerging economies. According to UNICEF about 90% of all child deaths from diarrhea are linked to lack of sanitation and contaminated water. Poor sanitation can kill almost a million people a year. Sanergy will transform the lives of 8 million people living in Kenyan slums. Sanergy builds low cost sanitation centers and distributes them to local franchises. Waste is then collected and processed into fertilizers and power through Sanergy’s Fresh Life toilet. The Katerva Award finalists this year are the following: Food Security - The China Study Behavioral Change - 350.org Economy - world of good Protected Areas - award withheld Gender Equality - DNA Foundation Materials & Resources - Sanergy Human Development - Solarclave Energy & Power - Barefoot Power Transportation - Nissan Leaf Urban Design- Freshkills Park The selection panel was made up of Jeremy Rifkin (President of the Foundation on Economic Trends), Marina Silva (Acclaimed Environmentalist and Politician), Gunter Pauli (Director of the Zero Emissions Research Initiative), Jean-Michel Cousteau (Explorer, Environmentalist, and Educator), Mary Robinson (Former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights), Lord St. John of Bletso (Member of the House of Lords and Clean Tech Advocate), Dr. J. Craig Venter (American Biologist known for sequencing the human genome), and John Elkington (Executive Chairman of Volans and Founder of SustainAbility). The Katerva Award winner will be accelerated with the help of the Katerva community: a global alliance that includes among its members the world’s most distinguished companies, people, policy makers and nonprofits committed to improving the state of the world. Katerva, founded in 2010 by business intelligence strategist Terry Waghorn, is a not-for-profit organization that finds, evaluates and accelerates disruptive, sustainable innovations that will show measurable impact on this planet in the next 10 years. Katerva comes from the Latin word Caterva which means “crowd.” Katerva’s distributed networks of CEOs, heads of state, ministers and policymakers, experts and academics, international organizations, youth, and technology innovators are fundamental to finding and then accelerating technologies for dramatic, positive changes that can be seen in our lifetime.
Bioneedle - Katerva Award 2012 Grand Prize Winner : Katerva Award winner selected to have an immediate, scalable impact on vaccination rates globally A new breed of social “Impact” companies are showing how innovation can be scaled for both business opportunities and global good. Led by resolute and independent thinkers, these companies are making dents in conventional ways of thinking to defy and fight for global change. The Katerva Award identifies these companies as finalists annually in its global competition –– referred to by Reuters as "the Nobel Prize for Sustainability" –– with Bioneedle, as the winning company this year. Bioneedle is a tiny, hollow implantable needle that dissolves inside the body within seconds. Inoculation is instant, with no disposal of needles required. Thermo-stabilized, the needles and vaccine do not need refrigeration. With this solution, emerging economies can overcome severe limitations in inoculating children and adults against easily preventable diseases. Some 2,500 ideas were submitted to the Katerva Award council last year and Bioneedle was selected as this year’s winner 2012 –– as the missing link to making sure that vaccinations globally are safe and delivered to those who need them. “This solution is within reach –– to vaccinate 25 million children worldwide who are susceptible to hepatitis and HIV infection and diseases which have virtually vanished from other parts of the world,” says Terry Waghorn, the founder and executive director of Katerva. “We will apply all of our resources and global community of experts to make sure this technology gets in the right hands –– of the people who need it.” “Katerva is not just interested in 'good' ideas, the ideas we are after will create big changes in how we live on this planet,” says Waghorn. “Katerva's approach places emphasis squarely on action for a sustainable future—creating and implementing solutions to sustainability-related concerns,” he says. Katerva is the first truly open worldwide platform for change. “To solve the complex sustainability challenges we face as stewards of our planet, will require innovative solutions across a wide range of disciplines and economic sectors. Katerva provides a much needed and novel forum for this to happen, as evidenced by the innovation and entrepreneurship embodied by this year's Finalists for the Katerva Award, “ states Antonio J. Busalacchi, Jr., Director of the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) and Professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science at the University of Maryland, USA. Finalists for the Katerva Award 2012 include: Eco-Fuel Africa, Sino-implant, Womankind Worldwide, Voice 4 Girls, The Water Initiative, A Liter of Light, Center for Rice Husk Technology, Amazon Conservation Team, Blue Ventures, Forest Trends, Mitsubishi Air Lubrication System for Shipping, LanX and Local Capital Markets, Solidarium, Pasteurization Technology Group, Kenguru, International Development Enterprises India, The Living Building Challenge, Kéré Architecture, Holomic LLC, Bioneedle Technologies Group, Streetline Inc., The Humblefactory (for Alchematter.org), StatSilk /StatPlanet Project, The Gender Equality Foundation, Evacuated Tube Transport Technologies (ET3), AquaClara, Liquid Metal Battery Corporation, Embrace, C-Change, YikeBike, Asthmapolis, Nano Ganesh, MIT SENSEable City Lab Forage Tracking, Foldit, Safe World for Women, Gram Power, The GROW BIOINTENSIVE Agriculture Centre of Kenya, Future of Fish, Liquid Robotics, Reef Check Foundation, Maplecroft Climate Innovation Indexes, The Savory Institute, WikiCell Designs, AMEE, WaterCredit, SHFT.com, 5 Stone Green Capital LLC (5SGC), Eco-Household Training, ¡Échale! a tu casa, Backpack Farm Agricultural Program, EyeNETRA. Katerva, founded in 2010 by business intelligence strategist Terry Waghorn, is a not-for-profit organization that finds, evaluates and accelerates disruptive, sustainable innovations that will show measurable impact on this planet in the next 10 years. Katerva comes from the Latin word Caterva which means “crowd.” Katerva’s distributed networks of CEOs, heads of state, ministers and policymakers, experts and academics, international organizations, youth, and technology innovators are fundamental to finding and then accelerating technologies for dramatic, positive changes that can be seen in our lifetime.
MBA Polymers - Katerva Award 2013 Grand Prize Winner : Katerva Award winner selected to have an immediate, scalable impact on reducing plastic waste globally San Diego. May 3, 2014. A new breed of companies are showing how innovation can be scaled for both business opportunities and global good. Led by resolute and independent thinkers, these companies are making dents in conventional ways of thinking to defy and fight for global change. The Katerva Award identifies these companies as finalists annually in its global competition –– referred to by Reuters as "the Nobel Prize for Sustainability" –– with MBA Polymers, as the winning company this year. Some 2,500 ideas were submitted to the Katerva Award council last year and MBA Polymers was selected as this year’s winner. MBA Polymers specializes in recycling durable goods from waste streams such as electronics and auto-shredder residue. Its patented technology can extract and recycle plastic from computers, printers, mobile phones, televisions, fax machines, refrigerators, vacuum cleaners, and other forms of waste. The company is a World Economic Forum Tech Pioneer, and works with the Plastic Bank to develop initiatives to incentivise people around the world to recycle more plastic and improve the sustainability of the plastics industry. “Katerva is not just interested in 'good' ideas, the ideas we are after will create big changes in how we live on this planet,” says Terry Waghorn, the founder and executive director of Katerva. “Katerva's approach places emphasis squarely on action for a sustainable future—creating and implementing solutions to sustainability-related concerns,” he says. Katerva is the first truly open worldwide platform for change. “To solve the complex sustainability challenges we face as stewards of our planet, will require innovative solutions across a wide range of disciplines and economic sectors. Katerva provides a much needed and novel forum for this to happen, as evidenced by the innovation and entrepreneurship embodied by this year's Finalists for the Katerva Award, “ states Antonio J. Busalacchi, Jr., Director of the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) and Professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science at the University of Maryland, USA. Finalists for 2011 include: Kiva U Bolsa Verde do Rio de Janeiro Bycatch Reduction Aquion Energy Practical Action’s Zeer Pot Clay Fridge WE CARE Solar Solar Ear International The CityCar (MIT Media Lab) ARCHIVE Global Katerva, founded in 2010 by business intelligence strategist Terry Waghorn, is a not-for-profit organization that finds, evaluates and accelerates disruptive, sustainable innovations that will show measurable impact on this planet in the next 10 years. Katerva comes from the Latin word Caterva which means “crowd.” Katerva’s distributed networks of CEOs, heads of state, ministers and policymakers, experts and academics, international organizations, youth, and technology innovators are fundamental to finding and then accelerating technologies for dramatic, positive changes that can be seen in our lifetime.
The Ocean Cleanup - Katerva Award 2015 Grand Prize Winner : A new breed of companies are showing how innovation can be scaled for both business opportunities and global good. Led by resolute and independent thinkers, these companies are making dents in conventional ways of thinking to defy and fight for global change. The Katerva Award identifies 10 of these companies as finalists annually in its global competition –– referred to by Reuters as "the Nobel Prize for Sustainability" –– with The Ocean Cleanup, as the winning company this year. (Impact investors: Katerva has done the due diligence for you.) Some 3,500 ideas were submitted to the Katerva Award council last year and The Ocean Cleanup was selected as this year’s winner –– as a force to reverse plastic pollution at sea, using a massive current-powered sieve. The Ocean Cleanup –– conceived in 2013 by Boyan Slat from the Netherlands (pictured above), then only 19-years-old –– is taking on the biggest ocean remediation challenge in history: to remove the “soup” of plastic bits floating in our oceans. Not too soon, either. Plastic pollution is choking marine life —at least one million seabirds and 100,000 marine mammals die each year from plastic pollution. And it is affecting human health, too, as toxins from plastic enter our food chain –– and bodies. Powered by waves in the middle of the sea, The Ocean Cleanup is in essence a massive sieve which passively collects sea plastics from up to 3 meters (or 10 feet) deep. Once retrieved, the plastic can be recycled into new products or fuel. Feasibility studies indicate that one 100 km (or 63 mile) array could remove 42 percent of the Great Pacific garbage patch in only 10 years. “Being recognized by Katerva means that The Ocean Cleanup is trusted to succeed in its mission and its drive for innovation. We are deeply honored and hope that the Award and Katerva’s support will go a long way towards reaching our dream of clean oceans,” says Slat. The Katerva Award runner-up this year is Salt Farm Texel, a proven agriculture technology that can grow food on land that was previously considered to be unsuitable for farming. The Katerva Award winner will be accelerated with the help of the Katerva community: a global alliance that includes among its members the world’s most distinguished companies, people, policy makers and non-profits committed to improving the state of the world. “I just love the systemic approach of Katerva: we not only identify amazing projects such as The Ocean Cleanup, we have also organizations and individuals in place who can help accelerate such projects, and bring them to their full potential, sooner,” says Dr Bettina von Stamm, Director of the Katerva Award. ” I just love the passion and commitment Katerva inspires.” Katerva, founded in 2010 by business intelligence strategist Terry Waghorn, is a not-for-profit organization that finds, evaluates and accelerates disruptive, sustainable innovations that will show measurable impact on this planet in the next 10 years. Katerva comes from the Latin word Caterva which means “crowd.” Katerva’s distributed networks of CEOs, heads of state, ministers and policymakers, experts and academics, international organizations, youth, and technology innovators are fundamental to finding and then accelerating technologies for dramatic, positive changes that can be seen in our lifetime. Follow Katerva on Facebook or Twitter @katerva and find the nominee profiles at www.katerva.net. Complete list of this year’s Katerva Award category winners: Behavioral Change: Winner: Fairphone is working to improve the life-cycle of cell phones by sourcing conflict-free minerals and upcycled plastics to including fair factory wages in phone manufacturing. Finalists: World Community Grid, Sustainability Consortium, GoodGuide Economics: Winner: Social Progress Index is crucial to portraying a country’s potential for social progress, beyond meeting the population’s basic needs. Finalists: Better World Books, Essmart, Institute for Economics and Peace, Oradian Environment: Winner: The Ocean Cleanup is developing a passive, plastic collection system to remove plastic pollution from our oceans. Finalists: Ecosia, Greenwave, Tree-Nation, Harbo Technologies Food: Winner: Salt Farm Texel has created novel advances in saline-resistant crops to counter the loss of arable soil and freshwater resources. Finalists: Wakati, ThinkFoodGroup, Oberon Nutrinsic, Muufri Gender Equality: Winner: Akili Dada helps young women and girls aged 13 to 35 earn the essential qualifications and skills needed to take their place in decision-making roles in society. Finalists: I Am That Girl, Global Fund for Women, No Ceilings, Ruwon Nepal Human Development: Winner: Nanoly has developed a chemistry solution so that vaccines can survive without refrigeration. Finalists: Mine Kafon, MOM Inflatable Incubator, Nano Membrane Toilet, Braigo Materials & Resources / Water: Winner: Nebia Shower uses rocket technology to create an immersive cloud of mist that cleans the body and saves water. Finalists: Lifestraw, Step Forward Paper, SCiO, Benthic Labs Power & Energy: Winner: GravityLight uses a weight to run a small generator to power an LED. It costs nothing to run and does not require sunlight or batteries to recharge. Finalists: StoreDot, LanzaTech, General Fusion, Pollinate Energy Transportation: Winner: Qualcomm Halo provides wireless, electric vehicle charging. No cables needed. Finalists: Blablacar, Holland Container, Proterra, Ray C Anderson Memorial Highway Smart Cities: Winner: Living Breakwaters builds layered breakwaters around cities which are constructed of ecologically engineered concrete to attenuate wave action, create a habitat for fish, and provide calm waters for recreation on land. Finalists: Visible Good, Kite Bricks, Centre for Active Design, Tube Barrier
Ethereum - Katerva Award 2016 Grand Prize Winner : Katerva Award winner and finalists selected to have an immediate, scalable impact on health, food chain, economics and energy Meat from plants, a new banking system for social change, good energy from food waste: A new breed of companies are showing how innovation can be scaled for both business opportunities and global good. Led by resolute and independent thinkers, these companies are making dents in conventional ways of thinking to defy and fight for global change. The Katerva Award identifies these companies as finalists annually in its global competition –– referred to by Reuters as "the Nobel Prize for Sustainability". Some 3,500 companies and organizations were submitted to the Katerva Award council last year and Katerva selected 10 companies as this year’s finalists –– as forces to revolutionize areas such as food, business, transportation, energy and economics. The Katerva Award winner this year, 2016, goes to Ethereum, a decentralized banking system that could upend inefficient and exclusive conventional bank systems and financial markets. Ethereum runs apps on a custom built blockchain, an enormously powerful shared global infrastructure that can move value around and represent the ownership of property. This enables developers to create markets, store registries of debts or promises, move funds in accordance with instructions given long in the past (like a will or a futures contract) and many other things that have not been invented yet, all without a middleman or counter-party risk. It is exactly this kind of innovation that goes beyond last-century thinking, and lifetime-only aspirations to leap-frog over current limitations in our global economy as a force for radical, global improvements for people and planet. Terry Waghorn, Katerva's founder and executive director explains: “Katerva is not just interested in 'good' ideas, the ideas we are after will create big changes in how we live on this planet. Katerva's approach places emphasis squarely on action for a sustainable future—creating and implementing solutions to sustainability-related concerns,” he says, noting that Katerva is the first truly open worldwide platform for change. Katerva, was founded in 2010 by Waghorn, a business intelligence strategist. Katerva uses people and leading-edge diagnostic tools to source, evaluate and accelerate disruptive, sustainable innovation that will show measurable impact on this planet in the next 10 years. “To solve the complex sustainability challenges we face as stewards of our planet, will require innovative solutions across a wide range of disciplines and economic sectors. Katerva provides a much needed and novel forum for this to happen, as evidenced by the innovation and entrepreneurship embodied by this year's Finalists for the Katerva Award, “ states Antonio J. Busalacchi, Jr, Director of the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) and Professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science at the University of Maryland, USA. Katerva Award Finalists for 2016 include: Behavioral Change: Choose Energy: The Texas-based startup, Choose Energy, was founded in 2008 as a marketplace for clean technology and services. Choose Energy, launched with the vision of simplifying shopping for electricity and natural gas rates, plan terms and renewable energy options for the average consumer and small business. Choose Energy makes it easy for people to save money on energy costs by switching to a 100% green product such as wind power. Environment: Holganix, organic lawn care,sells environmentally- friendly lawn care products that contain natural microorganisms. Their products reduce the use of fertilizers as much as 90%. Holganix's management team successfully grew two multi-million dollar lawn care companies in the past, now focusing on growing another with a greater, greener goal. Holganix pledged to eliminate 100,000,000 pounds of nitrates, 100,000,000 pounds of phosphates and 25,000,000 ounces of concentrated pesticides by Earth Day 2016. Food: Impossible Foods Inc., a startup offering sustainable vegetarian produce to conscious consumers across the U.S. since 2011 out of Redwood City, CA. By a complex molecular process, Impossible Foods selects specific proteins and nutrients from green foods to create imitation foods such as the cheeseburger. Gender Equality: The Mann Deshi Bank, a micro-enterprise development bank working with low-income women to provide business loans. This is India’s first rural co-operative bank owned by women. Mann Deshi aspires to launch 1 million rural women entrepreneurs through partnerships with social enterprises and mainline financial institutions in India. Founder Chetna Sinha also established a business school for rural women to provide training in entrepreneurial skills and set up a toll-free hotline linked to India’s Chamber of Commerce to give rural women financial advice. Human Development: Solarkiosk, a Berlin-based social enterprise has provided solar-powered autonomous business hubs to off-the-grid communities since 2011. By 2014, Solarkiosk established six subsidiaries in different countries across Africa and Asia. Rural communities now have access to sustainable energy, refrigeration, water purification, charging, communication, technology, information and business opportunities previously unheard of. This bottom of the pyramid approach enables and empowers local kiosk owners with green technology. Solar Kiosks provide solar energy to people in off-grid locations. Materials, Resources and Water: Grolltex is an early-stage company with breakthrough technology for the mass production of graphene. The company has developed a method in which graphene is grown on a copper substrate and overlaid with a sheet of nickel. Because graphene adheres better to nickel than to copper, the entire graphene single-layer can be easily removed and remains intact over large areas. Their technology allows local, waste-free industrial production of large-area graphene (the "hottest" and the most expensive material currently in existence) at a price that is 240,000 lower than the current market price. Economics: Ethereum Power & Energy: Arctic Sand launched out of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2011, with the goal to save the 80% of all energy that is lost in the form of heat worldwide. The power conversion technology startup offers products with proprietary technology developed and exclusively licensed from MIT. This technology,“Transformative Integrated Power Solutions,” significantly improves power conversion Efficiency. Smart Cities: WISErg describes itself as a ‘hybrid technology company combining bio-, clean-, and high-tech systems to create a revolutionary solution for managing urban-generated organics.” The Harvester product is a machine that transforms food waste into high-quality fertilizer before it becomes waste. The food matter becomes a sort of high nutrient liquid that can be converted to organic lawn care product. Launched commercially in 2014, the company achieved early success. Harvesters are installed in stores and facilities including Whole Foods Market. Transportation: Otto, a start-up set up and funded by a group of former employees from Google, Apple and Tesla, is working on a kit to turn commercial lorries into self-drive vehicles. The kit will include cameras, radar and lidar (laser-based) sensors which will allow the vehicle to safely keep within a lane, maintain a set speed and slow or stop when necessary. San Francisco-based Otto currently has around 40 employees, including Anthony Levandowski, who built Google's first self-driving car. Katerva comes from the Latin word Caterva which means “crowd.” Katerva’s distributed networks of CEOs, heads of state, ministers and policymakers, experts and academics, international organizations, youth, and technology innovators are fundamental to finding and then accelerating technologies for dramatic, positive changes that can be seen in our lifetime. Follow Katerva on Facebook or Twitter @katerva
Khan Academy - Katerva Award 2014 Grand Prize Winner : Open source schooling gives educational opportunities to everyone A new breed of companies and social organizations are showing how innovation can be scaled for both business opportunities and global good. Led by resolute and independent thinkers, these companies are making dents in conventional ways of thinking to defy and fight for global change. The Katerva Award identifies these companies and organizations as finalists annually in its global competition –– referred to by Reuters as "the Nobel Prize for Sustainability" –– with the Khan Academy, as the winning organization this year –– 2014. Some 2,500 ideas were submitted to the Katerva Award council last year and Khan Academy was selected as this year’s winner, 2014. The Khan Academy is an open, online educational resource that offers free, universal and personalized learning across disciplines. Evolving from a series of YouTube videos, the Khan Academy demonstrates the potential of open, accessible, and inclusive educational materials. The platform contains over 5,500 instructional videos and 100,000 practice problems covering more than 30 subjects, encompassing everything from finance to biology and art history. Its open nature means that Khan Academy can bring educational value to all contexts and settings, from off-grid schools in remote areas to curious retirees. In the classroom, data dashboards help its 350,000 registered teachers to monitor their students’ progress and provide targeted assistance, with measured improvements in performance. This open online educational resource enables universal and personalized learning across disciplines. Evolving from a series of YouTube videos, Khan Academy demonstrates the potential of open, accessible, and inclusive educational materials. The platform contains over 5,500 instructional videos and 100,000 practice problems covering more than 30 subjects, encompassing everything from finance to biology and art history. Its open nature means that Khan Academy can bring educational value to all contexts and settings, from off-grid schools in remote areas to curious retirees. In the classroom, data dashboards help its 350,000 registered teachers to monitor their students’ progress and provide targeted assistance, with measured improvements in performance. With volunteer-driven translations in 28 different languages, impact has been amplified far beyond the boundaries of school campuses. Katerva, founded in 2010 by business intelligence strategist Terry Waghorn, is a not-for-profit organization that finds, evaluates and accelerates disruptive, sustainable innovations that will show measurable impact on this planet in the next 10 years. “Katerva is not just interested in 'good' ideas, the ideas we are after will create big changes in how we live on this planet,” says Waghorn. “Katerva's approach places emphasis squarely on action for a sustainable future—creating and implementing solutions to sustainability-related concerns,” he says. Katerva is the first truly open worldwide platform for change. Finalists in the following categories for 2014 include: Behavioral Change: City and County of San Francisco Department of the Environment Economics: Bitcoin Environment: Biomatrix Water Active Ecosystems Food Security: Netafim Gender Equality: The Gender Equality Principles Initiative Materials and Resources: Modern Meadow Power and Energy: Retroficiency’s Building Efficiency Intelligence Platform Smart Cities: Power Plus Communications Transportation: Proterra’s EcoRide “To solve the complex sustainability challenges we face as stewards of our planet, will require innovative solutions across a wide range of disciplines and economic sectors. Katerva provides a much needed and novel forum for this to happen, as evidenced by the innovation and entrepreneurship embodied by this year's Finalists for the Katerva Award, “ states Antonio J. Busalacchi, Jr, Director of the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) and Professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science at the University of Maryland, USA. Katerva comes from the Latin word Caterva which means “crowd.” Katerva’s distributed networks of CEOs, heads of state, ministers and policymakers, experts and academics, international organizations, youth, and technology innovators are fundamental to finding and then accelerating technologies for dramatic, positive changes that can be seen in our lifetime. Follow Katerva on Facebook or Twitter @katerva and find the nominee profiles at www.katerva.net.
Sustainable Health Enterprises (SHE) identified as Grand Prize Winner of the 2017 Katerva Awards : In this sixth year of the Katerva Awards over 500 nominations were received across the ten award categories: Energy & Power; Food; Environment; Transportation; Smart Cities; Economy; Materials, Resources and Water; Behavioral Change; Gender Equality; and Human Development.After the 100 Finalists, 10 per category, were identified through human interaction and machine evaluation, the global network of experts set to work to identify the 10 Category Winners. In a final step Katerva’s prestigious Awards Council identifying the 2017 Katerva Award Grand Prize Winner: Sustainable Health Enterprises (SHE). SHE has developed an environmentally sustainable menstrual pad with a scalable business model that uses agro waste readily available in developing countries. Upon notification of the awards SHE28's Director of Strategy, Connie Lewin, commented: "We hope that our holistic model of local sourcing and local production with our SHE28 initiative will serve as a catalyst for new and sustainable approaches to tackling taboo and overlooked health problems across the world. The Katerva prize is global recognition that our innovative use of banana fiber into an essential health product is more than a novelty; it's a transformative solution that delivers real impact on communities globally." Below the full listing of Finalists and the Category Winners of the 2017 Katerva Awards Behavioral Change: Category Winner: APOPO is a non-profit organization that trains giant African pouched rats, nicknamed ‘HeroRATs’, to save lives by detecting landmines and tuberculosis by using their impressive olfactory skills. Finalists: Beat the Microbead, Capsula Mundi, Das Geld hängt an den Bäumen, DeathLAB: Perpetual Constellation, Economics for the Anthropocene, Green Apes, Mobile Diagnostic Kit for Pulmonary Diseases, Precious Plastic, TostanEconomy:Category Winner: Mobisol offers easy-to-use solar home systems for low-income people. These plug’n play systems are quickly installed by locally trained and certified technicians (which furthers employment). An innovative pay-as-you-go scheme allows the customer to pay off the installation, up to over 36 months, using mobile banking services. Finalists: Agrarian Trust, Banqer, Cultivando Futuro, Olakusibe Famuyibo / Innov8 Coffee ltd, SolarTurtle, Taking Root, TransactiveGrid, UCAPTURE Energy & Power: Category Winner: Gallium nitride power conversion by GaN - Gallium nitride has a very low on-resistance, superior fast-switching capabilities, and zero reverse recovery losses which allows for a very efficient power conversion, achieving 98 to 99% efficiency. Applications include electric cars, solar, wind and smart-grid, and high-efficiency power supply. Finalists: Acoustically Driven Magnetized Target Fusion, Ductor, Hydrogen Capturing Material, Micro Wind Turbine, Ocean University of China in Qingdao, Plant-E, Stanford Aluminum BatteryThe Silent Revolution, SunCellEnvironment:Category Winner: CarbonCure concrete production - The technology enables concrete to permanently capture carbon dioxide (CO2), while enhancing concrete’s strength and value, upcycling waste CO2 sourced from final emitters such as refineries or fertilizer plants. Finalists: Carbon Capture Membrane-Nano sponge, De-coating by No-Coats, Glatt Stove, HomeBiogas, Illinois River Project, KTK-BELT, O'right, Project subCULTron, Seawater GreenhouseFood:Category Winner: Evaptainers are electricity-free mobile refrigeration units which run at low-cost. Utilizing the phenomenon of evaporative cooling, rather than more energy-intensive vapor compression refrigeration, they are ideal for use in off-grid rural areas with low relative humidity. Finalists: FarmBot, Flying SpArk, Hargol FoodTech (formerly Steak TzarTzar), Jellyfish Barge, Kulisha, Phresh, Neem-oil based biopesticide by Terramera, Tal-Ya, The Sexy Plant Gender Equality:Category Winner: Sustainable Health Enterprises - To affect social, environmental, and economic change, SHE28 utilizes a comprehensive market-based model to manufacture and distribute locally sourced eco-friendly pads, driving job creation and tackling the status quo. Finalists: 1 Million Women, ASHRAY, invi, Promundo (co-coordinates MenCare campaign), SWEEP, Frontier MarketsHuman Development:Category Winner: Bibak has developed CANNY, a modular pod of sensors that contains a metal detector, a georadar and a sensor for vapors from explosives which is a breakthrough combination in the detection field, able to locate even plastic and wooden landmines. It includes a landmine marker, a first-aid kit that meets international demining regulations and water to fight the number one problem of deminers: dehydration. Finalists: Hablando con Julis, In2Care BV, Jack Andraka, Lucky Iron Fish, Point-of-Care Zika Detection Device, Rapid, Low-Cost Detection of Zika and beyond, The Autism Glass Project, The Mosquito Killer Billboard, University Of BuffaloMaterials, Resources & Water:Category Winner: MIT Thin Film Solar Cells - the world’s thinnest solar photovoltaic cells are so light they can sit on a soap bubble and are able to get 400 times more power per weight than silicon-based cells. Finalists: Airlite, IBM's Breakthrough in Fighting Viral Diseases, Ingestible origami robot, Light-up stretchy skin, Nanoflotation Technology for Fluid (Water Treatment), Recycling technology by Pyrowave, StretchSense, Wang Group Flexible, Warka Water "Every drop counts"Smart Cities:Category Winner: eLichens - provides unique miniaturized pollutant sensors and cloud software services that can detect, monitor and predict air quality which allow it to benefit from Smart City services that are emerging for managing city’s green spaces & infrastructure, energetics footprint, pollution sources, traffic management and carbon budget. Finalists: Green Junkie, Jet Capsule, Living Architecture Systems Group, Mountain Forest Hotel, RegenVillages, Smart Floating Farms, SmartLight, The Great Urban Challenge, V2T TechnologyTransportation:Category Winner: ElectRoad - ElectRoad is paving the way for future clean and safe e-mobility solutions with a unique Dynamic Wireless Electrification System for electric transportation. ElectRoad’s revolutionary technology x removes the energy source (ie. NO battery, chemicals) from the vehicle and powers it wirelessly via minimal infrastructure located under the driving lane. Finalists: BioSealcoat, Cloud-based Traffic Network Management - Data insights for more efficient traffic routing, Commuters ridesharing Netlift, GreenQ, Ogo Technology, Pouncer, Traveler app, WayCareIn addition to the kudos of being associated with the Nobel Prize for Sustainability, as Reuters have called the Katerva Awards, Finalists benefit from what we refer to as ‘Winners Circle’, a group of organisations who donate their services for a certain number of hours over a certain period of time either to just the Grand Prize Winner, the 10 Finalists, or even the top 5 or 10 in each award category. Past members of the Winners Circle have included Edelman, Ernst & Young, Frog Design, Indiana University Kelley School of Business, Ipsos, Korn Ferry and TrustLaw.For more information contact Katerva’s Director of Awards Program, Dr Bettina von Stamm (bettina@katerva.net). Follow Katerva on Facebook or Twitter @katerva

Katerva Awards - Category Winners

Transportation
Smart Cities
Materials, Resources & Water
Human Development
Environment
Energy & Power
Behavioral Change
Transportation
Smart Cities
Materials, Resources & Water
Human Development
Gender Equality
Environment
Energy & Power
Behavioral Change

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